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Exclusive Interview with Broken Toy aka Sad Paradise

Local legend, James Copeland, has been ripping head-banging tracks for over 10 years under ever-popular aliases such as Broken Toy, Super Evil, Nesono and his proggy alter-ego, Sad Paradise. His musical style is punctuated by hard-hitting basslines, cheeky riffs and groovy melodies. James is set to perform two of his signature acts (i.e Broken Toy and Sad Paradise) this Saturday at Aurora presents Time Lock. We were fortunate enough to chat with him. This is what went down.

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*These questions were compiled by Batia Efrat on behalf of Psyked in the City.


Continue reading Exclusive Interview with Broken Toy aka Sad Paradise

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Exclusive Interview with Phixius (Equinox / FullMoon SA)

Phixius is the progressive psytrance project of 26 year old Anthony Elsey. Having won the Equinox “New Guy” competition last year, Anthony is rapidly making his name known within the psytrance scene. He’s set to play at Ground Zero Festival on the 15th of March alongside international artists such as Berg, Sesto Sento, and Blastoyz to name a few. We were lucky enough to have a chat with the Prog Prodigy. This is what went down.

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Psyked:
It’s so great to finally get the chance to speak with you. Let’s start off at the beginning. You’re a Somerset West boy at heart. Who introduced you to psytrance?

Phixius:
Hello Psyked! Really stoked to be doing an interview with you guys! I’m actually from Jozi originally. But I moved to Somerset West in 1999 (I was in grade six). I never looked back. Cape Town is my home now. I couldn’t think of a better place to live.

I was introduced to psytrance, properly, when I went to my first outdoor party in 2009 with two of my close friends Daniel Pienaaar and Chanene Norman. It was a Rezonance New Year’s party in 2009. I instantly fell in love with the scene and the music, but most of all with progressive psy.

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Psyked:
When did you first decide to pursue Djing?

Phixius:
I wanted to DJ after High School but I never really got the chance to do it. So Djing was very difficult for me, until a few years later when I met some awesome people who helped me get into it. I’ve been doing it solidly for one year and four months now, and it keeps getting better and better. 🙂

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Psyked:
So your alias, Phixius, how did it come about?

Phixius:
It’s Latin for taking to flight. I’ve had the name for a long time. One guy names his boat Phixius in a movie called “The Replacements.” I used to use it when I played computer games back in the day. It seemed like a good DJ name to me.

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Psyked:
Last year Phixius earned the title of Equinox’s “New Guy?” What does that mean to you and how has it helped you advance?

Phixius:
Winning Equinox “New Guy” was hands-down one of the best moments in my DJ career. It means the world to me. It really put me on the map and gave me exposure as a DJ. If I hadn’t won, I don’t think I’d be as successful. The funny thing is, I wasn’t going to enter the competition at all. I didn’t feel ready for it at the time, but my mates pushed me to enter, and I won. It was super stressful but the juice was so worth the squeeze! I’m also a resident DJ at Equinox and Full Moon SA. Being signed with two labels gives me a huge boost in the scene.

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Psyked:
I recently saw you perform at Equinox Experience Play Festival. Tell me a bit about that. Was it your first outdoor party?

Phixius:
My first outdoor was actually Groovy Troopers – Mandala Project. I played on the Hyper Dive stage. Considering it was my first party, it was much less pressure than playing on the main dancefloor so it eased me into playing bigger gigs slowly. Equinox Play Festival was unreal, definitely my top set to date. The crowd was unbelievable. It was a very emotional for me to see how everyone reacted to my music. When my set ended, the applause I got was so insane, I felt like shedding a tear.

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Psyked:
Your musical style is best described as “psy prog.” Which Djs influence you?

Phixius:
Vertical Mode, Ace Ventura, Symbolic, Ritmo, Born Sleepy and Timelock, to name a few.

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Psyked:
Where do your draw your inspiration from?

Phixius:
I draw inspiration from the crowd and my fans; seeing them smile, laugh and jam their hearts out to the music I play is such a rewarding feeling.

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Psyked:
You’re set to play at two milestone events this season; Ground Zero and Organik – Love Project. How exciting is this for you?

Phixius:
I am beyond excited! Both festivals have been on my hit-list in terms of parties I want to play at. I’m so stoked that I got booked for both of them.

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Psyked:
Any words of advice for up and coming Djs in Cape Town?

Phixius:
If Djing is something you really love doing and you have the drive put in the hours behind the decks at home, do it. The more you play, the better your ear becomes. And most of all, never give up, it takes some time. So be patient.

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Psyked:
What can we expect from Phixius in the near future?

Phixius:
Loads more banging sets! I’m busy learning to produce music too, so in the future you guys will see me producing some of my own tracks. Very exciting things coming up!

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Psyked:
Where can we catch you next?

Phixius:
I’ll be playing at Equinox on Wednesday, the 26th Of February at Fiction and Cold Fusion (hosted by The Village) on the 28th of February. So see all you peeps on the dance floor!! 😉 Thanks Psyked in the City for the interview, it was privilege. And to everyone who has supported me, much love to you all!

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EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW with Sway from Beartrap (Part 2)

Read PART 1: Exclusive Interview with Sway.

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Psyked: Which DJs inspire you and do you have a favourite track right now?

Sway: Right now my favourite internationals are Dapanji, I will always have a soft spot for Dapanji. They actually defined the type of sound that I play now. Lyle Jensen (AKA: Archive from MMD records) gave me the Dapanji track. He said to me, “you have to listen to this!” And I was like, “who the hell is Dapanji?” The track was called show time. I played it and thought, “OMG this is the shit.” And from that single track, my sound has moved towards electro and techno, which I really love now. But because I also love electro, I’m really enjoying  Blastoyz. I heard them live in Joburg.  It was an amazing set, even a sing-along set which I think is important at the right time during a party. We all drive to work in our cars or drive to varsity or whatever, and we listen and sing to 5FM and other stations. So to say you can’t have vocals in psytrance, the music you love, doesn’t make sense to me. I grew up singing to music. White Noise has been one of my absolute champions for as long as I can remember. Itay Eliya (White Noise) is actually doing some really super things right now, he’s so versatile. I think he has even done a few movie/film scores, but I stand to be corrected. His music is just super epic. I also love UltravoiceVibe Tribe and Orca is still one of my favourite full-on artists. Last but not least, Azax Syndrom. That dude blew me away when he played here! I really can’t name just one or two.

Forever and a day, I will look up to Bruce.  He is my yard stick because I know I’ll probably never be as good as he is, so I’m forced to keep pushing myself. Another DJ I look up to is Dave Mac. He really pumped the progressive for years. He kept saying, “it’s coming, it’s coming” and we kept saying, “don’t be stupid.” But somehow he knew it was.

One of the up and coming guys I have the utmost respect for is DJ Drang3D (aka Sirajuddin Kadri) because he also pushes and pushes the limit. I become inspired by DJs who are passionate about the scene. There are so many DJs out there who are riding their wave. I am looking for those guys who are making their wave. Those are the people that I want to play at our parties; DJs who love the scene and don’t only love being in the DJ box.

Psyked: As a DJ you guys put in an incredible amount of work, what is the most challenging aspect of your job? And have you ever made a really bad stuff up on a set? If so, how do you handle it?

Sway: When I played at The Side Show one Friday night for a Young N Underrated event, I was so nervous because I realized I was playing after Hyphen (he’s not a psy trance DJ). I nearly vomited #truereveal I was so nervous! I had an idea for a starting set which I should have practiced before but didn’t. It was such a f*ck up. Abby Chapel came out the office through the back and said to my friend Bianca, “what is she doing?!” I think some DJs never fuck it up but I am very spontaneous. I don’t believe in preparing a set and it has worked for me but it has also worked against me. Luckily I’ve never had such a big fuck up like jumping up and down in the DJ box and having my boob pop out or anything of that kind, which could be a disaster. So other than that, in hindsight the make up I did at Mystical Contact might have been a bit risqué but it was good fun.

Psyked: Speaking of which, I’ve seen you in face paint, tutu’s, corsets but what is the craziest thing you’ve ever worn to a party?

Sway: Mystical Contact was definitely my wildest outfit and when I started wearing corsets, it took people by surprise, I think. As a DJ I’d like to say, “yeah, the music is all it’s about” but it’s not. When you get up on a stage, you are bound by theatrical. It’s a stage. Regardless of whether you’re DJing, reading poetry, acting or doing acrobatics, you are there as a performer to entertain people and I don’t think you can just roll out of bed in PJ’s because that’s just boring (and embarrassing). I used to have really long mousy brown hair and one day I decided, that’s it, I’ve had it. I cut it and that was the day people stopped calling me Tune Raider. *laughs* I’d say the short, pink hair as well as the crazy bling makeup and outfits have definitely worked for my image. And I want to be different, that’s who I am.  I’ve always been very eccentric.

sway at mystical contact photo by logal lAt Mystical Contact, photo by: Logan L Photography.

Psyked: You’re known for swaying not only in the DJ booth but on the dancefloor too, how do you maintain a balance between your work and your play?

Sway: I have a T shirt that says “leave me alone, I’m dancing” which I wear most of the time. It saddens me that so few DJs/producers come just to party at events. I remember when you’d see DJs on the dancefloor at the parties they weren’t playing at. Until recently, it was difficult for me too because I have kids. But now my son’s 3 and my daughter’s 8, so they’re older and I can do it. The dancefloor is where you really connect with your fans. I think it’s important for them to see that you love the music that you play and you love the parties that you put on. It’s not just about fans coming to MY parties. If there’s a party with a rocking lineup, I will go to that party. For example, I was really amped that the Side Show brought down Cyberpunkers, and I will definitely check out R3hab because it’s electro and I feel like I haven’t been exposed to enough live electro from acts. You can’t really experience the music that other DJs are delivering if you’re not there jamming to it.  And as someone who is going to construct the lineups that I want fans to go wild about, how would I know who to choose if I’m not on the dancefloor loving the music?

Sway at soulstice photo by Michael YankelevDancing at the Soulstice Festival, photo by: Michael Yankelev.

Psyked: Is it tough to make time for your family and be a DJ? And do you feel that other members of society respect your profession or do you feel there is still an underlying stigma that trance parties are about drugs and hippies?

Sway: Ja, there’s definitely that stigma. I try to avoid telling people what type of music I play. But at my daughter’s school I’m the hero. The kids love it because of the pink hair and stuff but I think the moms don’t know how to respond to me. I don’t care actually. *laughs* Some of the mothers dig me and we get a long but I don’t really travel in those circles. I am too busy. In summer, it’s hard because I’m away when I’m doing my own parties. Often for a few days at a time. My kids understand. It’s been part of their lives from the start. They usually want to come and be part of it. When my son came with me to Mutha FM studio this year, he asked me, “is this where you dance Mommy?” So yes, it is hard and there is a stigma but after finding out what I do most parents go, “Oh my gosh, that’s actually quite awesome.” And it’s easier for them to find out after they’ve seen me with the pink hair.

sway with bruce photo by dreamer.
Sway with Bruce.

Psyked: Earlier you mentioned Bruce, would you say he’s a mentor of yours? Is there anyone else who you really look up to in the community?

Bruce was my mentor for a long time but we play similar sounding music so we kind of became competitive. We’ll still ask each other for advice. I’ve recently discovered that there’s a lot to be learned from electro/house DJs and electric DJs. Bryan Farrow is my new favourite DJ. He’s really good with his equipment. He can DJ. He doesn’t just drop two beats on top of each other, he mixes. I’m also a big fan of Grimehouse and Hyphen. Both of those boys are unreal behind the decks. I want to take what I do behind the decks to the next level. I plan to steal from them *winks* so that as the style merges, I can come out of the gate with a bang. I’m not sure about “looking up” to anyone, ’cause I think you get to a point when that changes.

Psyked: Maybe they’re looking up to you?

Sway: It could be. But I have a huge amount of respect for the guys from Ultranoize and what they’re trying to achieve, as well as the way that they do things. They keep it really underground and true to their hearts, you know. It’s hard to stay smaller and true to your core genre, because everyone needs to evolve. But as a group, the Ultranoize boys are very close to my heart. I love them. I also look up to Dave Love from Enough Weapons. He runs a record label, I get a lot of advice from him, and Lyle Jensen. That’s why these people are my partners. I admire what they do and I value their input above all else.

sway at Lyle at MMD photo by Llyod Newkirk
Sway with Lyle (Archive) at MMD, photo by: Rachel Doyle Photography.

Psyked: Your Twitter handle is @lovedancesway, but it’s a bit more than that, it’s your manifesto. Can you tell me a bit about it?

Sway: It’s who I am and how I got to this point. I love, I dance, I sway and I encourage people to do the same but to keep it real and to do it their way.  I love Twitter. I saw a tweet yesterday that said, “if you’re on the outside looking in, Twitter seems daunting but once you’re inside it’s like fucking Narnia.” Ain’t that the truth? Twitter is just a way to express yourself in quick bursts. I do have a lot to say. I talk all the time. My mother used to tell me that when I was a kid she only took in every fifth word I said to get the just of what I meant. My husband has learned to do that too.

I find that because human beings are voyeuristic by nature, they like to look into other peoples lives. Twitter is a way for people to get a window into your life and who you really are. And it’s a way of connecting with your fans and seeing another side of you. Music was, once upon a time, about artists coming and performing and fans then going and buying an album. Today artists put out two track EP’s so that people will listen to the music and people will come and watch them perform. That’s how they make their music now. It’s not about selling albums anymore. It’s about selling the person or selling the brand. I think that social media outlets like Facebook, Twitter, Soundcloud and Instagram are just means for people to get to know the brand a bit better and to see parts of a DJ you can’t see in the DJ box. I can put things out there that people can learn about me that they otherwise wouldn’t. It does give people a different image. For example, I have this ongoing love affair with snails and I’m trying to find out where they go when it stops raining. No one can tell me though.

herbal remedy photo by Logan LAt Herbal Remedy, photo by: Logan L Photography.

Psyked: Any big plans for the future and for 2014?

Sway: Ground Zero is going to be a big one. Last year it was on the same date as Celestial Beings but this year it’ll be on the 15th of March. We’re also going to partner up with Disasterpeace Records on the 25th of March for a new event. That’s very exciting. I can’t share the scoop now but it’ll be something completely different and hopefully it will speak to a massive amount of people who love psy trance. Not just my style or progressive or  dark psy or hard psy etc. Then maybe, I’ll make enough money to take my kids to Disney Land. I’ve been trying to do that for ten years, it’s my goal in life.  I just wanna see their little faces light up. Anyone want to sponsor me?

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EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW with Sway from Beartrap (Part 1)

Sway is one of South Africa’s most popular female psy-trance DJs. She’s also the co-owner of  Beartrap Productions; the organisation behind three of Cape Town’s major outdoor festivals, namely Ground Zero, Celestial Beings and Remanufacture (that is to take place on the 16th of November). Within the psy community, she’s affectionately referred to as Mama Bear, but her real name is Laura Ann Rix. During the past fifteen years Laura has progressed from capturing Cape Town’s psychedelic scene on camera to blasting her banging beats to thousands of fans on the dance floor nation-wide. Sway’s musical style can be described as powerful, bouncy, fun and always unexpected. She draws influence from a range of genres including full on, hard trance to electro and progressive. Through Beartrap Laura has exposed South African trance-enthusiasts to A-listing international acts such as Mystical ComplexDapanji, CPUMekkanikkaBizzare Contact, Exaile, Orca and Skazi. Laura firmly believes in engaging with her audience whether she’s in the DJ box, on the dance floor or online. Although her passion lies in outdoor parties, she frequents the indoor scene during winter too. You need only experience a Sway set live to feel the genuine love Laura has for psytrance and her fans.

sway at MMD ancients photo by Llod NewkirkAt MMD, photo by: Llyod Newkirk Photography.


Psyked: Hi Laura, I’m psyked to be chatting to you today, I’m a huge fan! You’re not only a resident DJ at Beartrap Productions. You’re co-owner. When did your involvement with Beartrap begin?

Sway: Sho, it all started with my husband. Before we were married he hooked up with this little gang of guys from Stellenbosch who owned Beartrap. They were all local kids who went to varsity there and they all knew eachother. They grew up on the farms of Stellenbosch and they had a massive following. My husband would do the sound for them. Then they grew up and out of trance parties and decided that they didn’t want Beartrap anymore, and were just going to let it go. So my husband bought Beartrap from them and we’ve kept it and built it up again over the next seven years. Doing production is an experience. It’s something I love. I’ve worked for Investec, I’ve worked for I.T companies, I’ve worked for programming companies, that’s what I used to do for a living. But I hated it. Hate, hate, hate!

Psyked: What was the first party you ever played at and how has the scene and your music evolved since then?

Sway: Now, that’s a good question. The first gig I ever had was at the old Gettafix, I thank Bruce for that. He’ll always be my hero. He gave me my first gig. Dave Mac gave me my second break which was at a club above Mama Africa called Upstairs, which my husband owned though we weren’t married at the time. That’s how I met him.

My first outdoor party was a Beartrap event, and funnily enough I was supposed to play in the evening but there was some issue with the generator, so they had to put me on in the afternoon. Rinkadink and Broken Toy played at that party too. It was very rustic back then. Parties weren’t like they are now, there weren’t the event regulations that we now have to guide things. Mostly, they were really well organised squat parties.  It was fun, it was underground. Everyone was grubby and dirty. Layered clothes and dread-locks were the in-thing. It’s changed since then, I think it’s become slightly more sophisticated. If you look at the younger kids who come into the scene now, they all come from a club background. They come to outdoor parties not necessarily  for the psy but for the outdoor party experience. I think, as organisers, we should acknowledge that. This season, Beartrap is going to break away from our tried-and-tested formula which has worked in the past. Now, we have our following, we have our base and we are going to try to give people more of what they want.

sway at fiction photo by equinox experienceAt Fiction, photo by: Equinox Experience.

Psyked: From the organiser’s perspective, what’s it like trying to cater for such a growing scene? Is it more difficult nowadays because there are so many party-goers? Are there more needs to satisfy?

Sway: I find that the biggest problem is that five years ago there was a party every two weeks and every one got a certain amount of people. Everyone’s parties did well because there was enough of a break in between each one.  But now, there’s a party every single weekend, and every season. I think there are enough people to feed all the parties but I don’t think that outdoor psy trance has the pull to get enough of those people to all of those parties. For example, if on one weekend nearly five thousand people go to  The Sunflower Festival and nearly the same number attend Alien Safari the following weekend, there’s a pull of ten thousand people you can tap into. But a lot of those people are not coming for the psy and that’s what makes it hard. They’re coming for the outdoor experience so they’re going for the brands they know. You have to build up your brand. I think it’s going to be tough on the smaller guys this season. People are going to have to think clever with what they’re doing.

sway at village photo by LV starAt the The Village, photo by: LVstar Photography.

Our philosophy has been to always bring only new talent to Cape Town. We debuted Menog, Smash3DTryambaka, Dapanji, Sinful Reactions, Orca and the list goes on and and on. Then we see other people bringing out acts that we debuted. Because we debuted them we did okay but now they’re making the money on it. This season, we’re bringing out Class A who was just here for Sunflower and got a really good reception. And we’re bringing Dapanji back. Hopefully we’ll debut Ranji’s progressive project as well, which is very funky and very sexy music. We’re also going to look at bringing down acts that have done well in the past but we’ll still try and bring new talent in also.  I don’t like force-feeding people things. In the past when we asked for feedback from the fans regarding the acts they wanted to see, they’d just repeat acts that have already been here. But it’s slowly changing and I feel that the psy followers are becoming more involved in what the artists are doing by getting to know which acts are connected to which, who is collaborating with who, what the different sounds are, where the DJs are playing and so forth. I don’t think it was like that five years ago, so that’s brilliant.

sway with bliss photo by dreamer.Sway with Bliss, photo by: Dreamer.

Psyked: Speaking about progressive, at the Eqlipse Full Moon event this winter you played a more “progressive” set. We’ve seen many progressive side projects start up lately. For example, Bruce has Synchronist  and EMP has Contra. Can we expect any more prog from Sway?

Sway: It’s a hard one. I don’t think prog is the right word. We need to come up with a different way to describe what Class AGhost rider, NeelixMorten Granau and those guys are producing because it’s not progressive. But this is the tag we have given it cause it’s slower. The music Gandalf plays, for example, is slightly more progressive in style (even what Wulfsohn played at Equinox Exclusive).
I still see it as full-on, it’s just slower. So we’re not looking at 145 BPM, we’re looking at 135 BPM, which is quite a lot slower when you have to move your feet to it. I really love it. I think it’s funky, I think it’s sexy. And I think it’s got melody, it’s got groove and it’s got the most essential psy trance quality which is a banging bass line! So yes, I played the same kind of set at Sunflower. I’d like to do the more “progressive” thing under another project name but it’s a challenge because Sway is already well known for the psytrance/techno sound. I’d happily play the progressive tunes on a Saturday night when a Sway set is booked but I still want to do a full-on set at the party. (Yes, it’s selfish, I admit it). I don’t want to lose touch with the full-on. That’s what I love. That’s how people know me and love me, too.

Psyked: I’ve heard that when you’re behind the DJ box that you adapt and alter your set according to the particular crowd. How does the vibe and energy of the dance floor actually affect you as a performer?

Sway: That’s a powerful question, Tia! It all depends on the event. At The Side Show, for example, I play for a more commercial crowd.  So I know that if I play tracks from Smashed or Orca, they might not go down as well. I can still play them and the dance floor will still jump up and down but ultimately, as a DJ my job is to be a conduit for music and to give the dance floor what they want. A producer gives the dance floor what they play, a DJ has to read the dance floor. On the other hand, when I play at Equinox Experience (Wednesdays at Fiction) I will play a similar set but less commercial with less vocals and when I play at Vortex,  I’ll plan a set that is much more psy-orientated, without any vocals at all. Having said that though, if I drop a track and see that the dance floor doesn’t respond or the back of the dance floor starts to empty out, I don’t play the whole track. I immediately move to something else and I’ll change the style, change the sound of the bass line, change the tempo and bring in a little bit of electro or whatever.

sway at mungus colour of time
At Mungus Fungus.

I’d say the hardest dancefloor I ever played to was a crowd, this winter, who just wanted electro. It didn’t matter what I did, they weren’t interested. It might even have been at the Side Show. I remember I dropped ScrovinskySkrillex and Deadmau5 and suddenly the dancefloor just picked up. I wasn’t even playing psy trance anymore but luckily I just happened to love that music and I had it in my bag. As a DJ you have to adapt. I have eaten a DJ’s set list that was given to me on a piece of paper, so I feel quite strongly about that. Know the direction of your set, maybe have an idea for your first track, see how the dance floor responds to that and then take it from there, that’s your job.

Psyked: Is there an event you’ve played at this year that you really enjoyed, or a moment when you really felt the vibe of the dance floor?

Sway: At The Village at the end of last season, I played an old school set on the second dancefloor. Then they closed the main dancefloor a bit earlier so everyone came down there and then I went from playing a two hour old school set to playing a nearly two hours long Sway set. The dancefloor underneath that small tent was just amazing! Everyone was obviously still psyked up from what they were getting on the main stage and they just brought that whole massive vibe with them. It was super.

sway at soulstice festival photo by michael yankelev 2At the Soulstice Festival, photo by: Michael Yankelev.

I thoroughly enjoyed playing at the SOULSTICE FESTIVAL in Joburg too. The crowd is different, it reminds me of the old free range parties from eight- ten years ago that I never ever played at because I wasn’t DJ-ing back then. But it’s a very hard crowd. They’re not like Cape Town fans who are super vocal. That’s why the international acts love playing here. Nobody shouted on the dancefloor in Joburg, it took me 45 minutes into my hour set to get a whoohoo from them. I really had to work it hard.

Psyked: Would you say that the Joburg psy scene is growing somewhat?

Sway: I definitely feel that it is. They also have a much more forgiving winter so their outdoor season can potentially be longer. It’s freezing there at night to the degree that your fingers will stick to the buttons on the mixer. But even though it’s cold, it’s not wet like Cape Town so during the day the sun will shine and people can still party. I think the Joburg scene is growing. There are a lot of good organisations out there who are buying space and every one of them seems to have their own unique brand, style and what they want to offer. I think that’s important. I see a massive amount of support by the organiser for each other which is great, too.

Psyked: So Remanufacture is coming up and it’s Beartrap’s first outdoor party of the season. The theme this year is IndepenDANCE, what inspired the name and what’s the message behind it?

Sway: The Cape Town scene has become very competitive among the organisers. Once upon a time in a land far, far away, we were all really close friends. I would go as far as to say that we’re still friends but it’s become competitive. I can’t say much more than that. It’s something that’s new-ish to the scene and it’s not something I love about it but it’s inevitable. As I told Psymedia in my interview last year, the only thing that we can expect from this scene is change and if we try hold onto it and to keep it the way it was five years ago we are going to throttle it to death. We have to let it evolve. It’s a living, growing community. The indepenDANCE theme is about that. It seems people bleat about which party is better, which party is bigger, who’s throwing the party, who’s going to the party, whether they have been doing it for a decade or one year. But, I don’t think this is the criteria that should be instrumental in fans deciding which events to go to.

Sway at remanufacture photo by EmelenAt Remanufacture 2012, photo by: Emelen Photography.

There’s a Deadmau5 track where the intro said it best: it’s about the music. It’s about a place where music is more important than the promoter, the venue, the DJ, what your man thinks, what your woman thinks. The music is more important than your clique or your clothes. It’s about coming together, being free to dance, to laugh, to express and to do it outdoors and have an amazing time, and be independent from all the bullsh*t that goes on. That’s what we want to do with this party, we want fans to disconnect and reconnect with this in mind.

Psyked: We all know that Dapanji is coming back to Cape Town for Remanufacture, how exciting is this for Beartrap and for you on a personal level?

Sway: Well when they came down for our 10th anniversary – which was our first really “big” party – they were the first internationals that I really connected with. They’re such down to earth, real guys and they had such an awesome time. So I’ve been waiting a while. And I can’t believe they were actually here in February of 2012, a year and a half ago. It seems like five years ago! When they got on the plane to go back home we said we’re bringing you down again as soon as the time is right. So when Beartrap decided to bring down an artist that had already rocked Cape Town, I knew it had to be Dapanji.  I’m super excited and I’m excited for Ranji to showcase his other projects because he’s really blossomed as an artist. Everyone knows Dapanji as super psy tech with it’s funky beats but  I think people are going to be really surprised at what Ranji has to offer with respect to this progressive style which is born from full-on and it is very warming to know that these guys can actually make more than just full-on. They clearly are musicians in their own right. They’re not just guys who are striping together little bits of digital data on a computer. So I am super excited about that.

 

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Read Part 2: Exclusive Interview with Sway.

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CONNECT…

 

Also check out…

Exclusive interview with Drang3D: Read it here.

IN THE PSYK LIGHT: Sirajuddin Kadri, AKA Drang3D .
He’s 25 and has been rocking up a storm in Cape Town, frequenting local hot spots such as
The Side Show and dropping beats along-side A-listers like Bizzare Contact and Mystical Complex. This month he’s set to share the stage with Israeli psy-hero, BlissI was fortunate enough to chat to him to find out more about the man behind the decks…

derang3d4
Photo: Dreamer.
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Psyked:    
Thank you for speaking to me today. I am a huge fun, like many other Capetonians.
For the last year or so, your name has been popping up all over the psy calandar.
How did you actually get into the trance scene?

Drang3D:  
My older brother and his friends have been listening to trance ever since
I entered this world. From as early as 8 years old I was listening to it, too.
It was Shabier Gaffoor, my older brother’s best friend, who later introduced me to Psytrance while we were taking a drive through to Llandudno. When we arrived at the beach, they took me to a cave with a clear view of the sea shore. All of a sudden beats were being played by Riyaaz Jogee (a WARD 10 member) through their “launch pad mixing console.” It truly was an eye-opening experience. I was blown away seeing the mixing live and so up-close. After that I had to go see where all of this was taking place. Rezonance was my very first Festival. After that, I was hooked!

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Psyked:          
Have you always enjoyed electronic music?

Drang3D:  
Electronic Music has always captivated me, especially really old-school vocal and uplifting trance.

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drang3d1

 Photo: Dreamer.

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Psyked:     

Where did you grow up?

Drang3D:
I grew up in Parkwood, Cape Town. Stayed there my entire life.

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Psyked:  
And when did you decide DJing is what you wanted to do?

Drang3D:    
Well, I just tried mixing one day, and it all made sense for some reason.
I began by creating mixes and posting them, and came to play my first gig
at The Lounge in Observatory. When I was on the floor that day, I realized DJing was what I was born to do.

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Psyked:  
Are you involved in any other projects at the moment?

Drang3D:        
I am currently working on a few tracks of my own. I would like to release an EP before the year concludes. I also have various collaboration projects that are waiting to kick off as soon as indoor season ends.

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Psyked: 
How would you describe your musical style?

Drang3D:        
I would say I’m leaning more towards full-on-power psy trance.
It’s all about the fattest bass lines that can keep a crowd moving and screaming for more.

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Psyked:         
Who inspires and influences you, musically?

Drang3D: 
None other than Aarmin Van Buuren. He has been a major influence
for me, his productions and mixing ability has not declined to this day.

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Psyked:     
Are there any DJs in particular you look up to?

Drang3D:        
DJ Bruce. Much respect to that man.

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Psyked:        
Which event thus far has been your favourite to play at?

Drang3D:
COMING SOON!!! Live at The Side Show.

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Psyked:    
If you could perform with any DJ who would it be?

Drang3D:
BLiSS! (That dream is being fulfilled on the 27th July).

Catch BLiSS in Cape Town, details here.

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Psyked:    
Do you prefer indoor or outdoor season?

Drang3D:       
Outdoor season. Who doesn’t love dancing in the fresh air with the sun beating down on you?
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Photo: ItsNot Phair Photography

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Psyked:   
What would you say has been your biggest personal accomplishment so far?

Drang3D:     
It would definitely be performing at the One World – New Years Eve Festival. It was my very first outdoor gig.

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Psyked: 
How did your DJ handle Drang3d come about?

Drang3D:  
Drang3D is the dark side that likes to cause a trouble…
So, I save trouble for the stage.

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Psyked:  
Are there any upcoming parties you are particularly excited about?

Drang3D:     
Groovy Troopers.
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Psyked:    
What are the biggest perks of being DJ?

Drang3D:  
Making people smile!
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Psyked:     
… and what do you find most challenging?

Drang3D:   
People talking to you while you are mixing -_-
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Psyked:
How do you feel about playing at events alongside recognized artists
like Mystical ComplexBizzare Contact and now, BLiSS?

Drang3D:
I’m still struggling to believe that it’s all happening. It’s an ecstatic feeling to share the stage with huge, International artists.
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Psyked:          
Have you DJ-ed overseas? Is there anywhere on the globe that
you dream of DJing at?

Drang3d:
No, I haven’t, but I would really love to play in Portugal, Israel,
Japan, India, Mozambique, Greece and Mexico.

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Drang3d2

Photo: The Kenyan With The Camera

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Psyked:
What do you think about Cape Town as a top psytrance destination?

Drang3D:      
There is no better place to party. We have diversity at its best,
amazing people, culture and beautiful weather.

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Psyked:      
Do you feel that the psytrance scene is growing in South Africa?

Drang3D:      
The scene is expanding at a very fast rate. Maybe we’ll be the trance capital of the world, one day.  😛

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Psyked:
Is there a track you’re currently working on to wow the crowd?

Drang3D:   
That’s top secret… will have to wait for now 😉

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Psyked:
Are there any tips you can offer to up and coming DJs?

Drang3D:        
Perseverance is a key aspect if you would like to grow in this industry.
Just keep mixing, regardless of what people have to say. Most importantly, always remember that it’s about the music FIRST.

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Catch Drang3D LIVE at…
PSYCHO CIRCUS – This Friday. psychocircus
aurora

BLiSS @
The Side Show on the 27th of July.

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Listen here. 


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WIN A TICKET to see Drang3D LIVE this Friday at PSYCHO CIRCUS.
Find out how here.

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Find out more about Drang3D.
Follow him on Soundcloud.

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